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(Source: hermiola, via oriibuu)

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shorelle:

One of my favourite parts of Winter Soldier was seeing Steve and Natasha disguised as hipster dorks. (welcome to 21st century fashion, Cap!)

shorelle:

One of my favourite parts of Winter Soldier was seeing Steve and Natasha disguised as hipster dorks. (welcome to 21st century fashion, Cap!)

(via oriibuu)

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j-sizz:

Tiramisu pistache au café sucré

(Source: j-sizzzzles, via kieran-648)

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teenagegaywad:

theodorepython:

coyotescorner:

peculiaraura:

itscandidlycaratempurl:

Friendly reminder this show was filmed in front of a live studio audience in one take.

And that all sitcom laugh tracks are taken from this show because the laughter was so sincere.

friendly reminder that this show was fuckin awesome

And most of the people who were recorded laughing are dead now. When you hear people laughing in sitcoms today, it’s the recorded laughter of dead people.

Well that escalated quickly

(via kieran-648)

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(Source: cross-connect, via kieran-648)

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Liz. No. Don’t. NO!

(Source: eunnieboo, via pythoness-at-delphi)

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Harry Potter as a teen comedy.

Evidence that music placement is very important. 

I swear I watch this every time it comes on my dash.

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YES. 

(Source: akasuna, via blueeyeswhitemeow)

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anastasia-cherubin asked: Hi Amanda! It's been a few months since I last left you a message and was recently inspired by your reply to another artist who mentioned CTNX. I've only heard this name one other time and my animation friends don't know a thing about it. I'm thinking it would be a great opportunity for me to attend and have a chance to show my portfolio; however, I'd like some advice on what a character artist portfolio needs to look great. I can imitate other styles, but how would that benefit my portfolio?

msmandapants:

jollylines:

Hey hey!  CTNX is wonderful.  For anyone who doesn’t know: CTNX is an animation expo held every November in Burbank, CA.  It features artist booths, panels with industry pros, live demos, and countless portfolio reviews with major studios and artists.  (I’m a HUGE proponent of getting your portfolio critted by as many people as you can stomach, because the feedback is invaluable.)  Also, everyone is SUPER nice there, so it’s a totally safe environment to share art and get advice!

Now, your actual question: character design portfolios!  To address your concern about styles, it’s, as all things are, trickier than one might hope.  haha.  I’ll try to break it down:

1) Know the company you’re showing to.  Like I said in my last askbox reply, knowing what studio you’re approaching usually informs the kind of art you show, and this is true of character design.  For example, Laika probably isn’t looking for the same kind of style as Disney, so your stuff could be a hit with one and not the other.

2) Know if your style is more TV or feature animation.  There’s a definite difference, and one’s not better than the other.  But Pixar probably isn’t looking for a portfolio that’s tailored for Cartoon Network.  Again, it’s about knowing your audience and knowing the visual difference.  

3) There’s no “one way” to get into the industry.  Some people get in because their style is so unique, that no one else can do it so the studio HAAAS to have THEEEEM.  Other people show they’re so versatile in their styles, that employers are excited to have someone on the team that can handle anything.  Because of this, it’s kind of a matter of assessing your own artwork and figuring out where you fall in that spectrum as a designer.

4) Does your work have “broad appeal”, e.g. could it fit many employers?  Keep in mind: it doesn’t have to, at all!  But there are probably more places that can find a spot for you if it does.  My style can kind of fit anywhere, so I used the same portfolio for all the studios.  I showcased roughly two feature animation “styles” that I do, to show I can adapt but that I also have a voice.  If my artwork was more experimental, I’d just have to know how it might limit my choices.  Or, I might have to make the additional effort to show other styles as proof I can do different things.

In general with character portfolios: show characters’ personalities.  Yes, design is important, but it’s only half of character design.  You can have awesome shapes going on, but if the character is standing there, blank expression and static pose, then I’ll have no idea who this person is or what I should think of her.  Make your characters ACT and MOVE.  Show them expressing emotion.  Show them interacting with and reacting to other characters.  These people you’re making won’t exist in a bubble: they’ll be on screen moving around, so you want to show HOW’D they’d move.  WHY they’d be engaging to watch.  MAKE us care.  Tell us a STORY.  Animation is simply story, and characters are the vehicles to tell it.  Also, “finished” work isn’t essential.  Really excellent, emotive sketches can go a very long way.

I hope some of this helps.  If there’s anything you want me to expand on, feel free to ask!

~Amanda 

Here, sometimes I pretend I show enough art publicly that people believe I really do this for a living and am good at it.  Enough so to warrant giving advice to others.  Here’s some of that advice.  HAHA

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upcomingdisneymovies:

"From Walt Disney Animation Studios comes ‘Big Hero 6,’ an action comedy adventure about brilliant robotics prodigy Hiro Hamada, who finds himself in the grips of a criminal plot that threatens to destroy the fast-paced, high-tech city of San Fransokyo. With the help of his closest companion—a robot named Baymax—Hiro joins forces with a reluctant team of first-time crime fighters on a mission to save their city. Inspired by the Marvel comics of the same name, and featuring comic-book style action and all the heart and humor audiences expect from Walt Disney Animation Studios, the CG-animated ‘Big Hero 6’ hits theaters in 3D on November 7, 2014. "

Source: http://movies.disney.com/big-hero-6

Follow me for the latest info on upcoming Disney movies!

My “this movie may be offensive” senses are activating

(via blueeyeswhitemeow)

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otakucityactor:

yugi u stone cold motherfucker

Hit the lighter with the gun towards Yami you twat

(Source: nflstreet, via blueeyeswhitemeow)

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casker:

artisansoulleader:

thepowerofmoonlight:

Learnt an interesting thing today on this arabic course,
The original Arabic number system looked like this, the one we now use.
It was designed so each character had the corresponding number of angles to the number, so the number 1 has 1 angle, 2 has 2 angles, 3 has 3, 0 has none etc…
It is so obvious now, I’ve always assumed its one of those things that just is, with no logical explanation, but here it is, perfectly simple and satisfying

My jaw is legit on the floor right about now :D

This is actually how my first grade teacher taught me to count!!

LIZ

casker:

artisansoulleader:

thepowerofmoonlight:

Learnt an interesting thing today on this arabic course,

The original Arabic number system looked like this, the one we now use.

It was designed so each character had the corresponding number of angles to the number, so the number 1 has 1 angle, 2 has 2 angles, 3 has 3, 0 has none etc…

It is so obvious now, I’ve always assumed its one of those things that just is, with no logical explanation, but here it is, perfectly simple and satisfying

My jaw is legit on the floor right about now :D

This is actually how my first grade teacher taught me to count!!

LIZ

(via oriibuu)

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america-wakiewakie:

Princeton Concludes What Kind of Government America Really Has, and It’s Not a Democracy | PolicyMic 
The news: A new scientific study from Princeton researchers Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page has finally put some science behind the recently popular argument that the United States isn’t a democracy any more. And they’ve found that in fact, America is basically an oligarchy.
An oligarchy is a system where power is effectively wielded by a small number of individuals defined by their status called oligarchs. Members of the oligarchy are the rich, the well connected and the politically powerful, as well as particularly well placed individuals in institutions like banking and finance or the military.
For their study, Gilens and Page compiled data from roughly 1,800 different policy initiatives in the years between 1981 and 2002. They then compared those policy changes with the expressed opinion of the United State public. Comparing the preferences of the average American at the 50th percentile of income to what those Americans at the 90th percentile preferred, as well as the opinions of major lobbying or business groups, the researchers found out that the government followed the directives set forth by the latter two much more often.
It’s beyond alarming. As Gilens and Page write, “the preferences of the average American appear to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy.” In other words, their statistics say your opinion literally does not matter.
That might explain why mandatory background checks on gun sales supported by 83% to 91% of Americans aren’t in place, or why Congress has taken no action on greenhouse gas emissions even when such legislation is supported by the vast majority of citizens.
This problem has been steadily escalating for four decades. While there are some limitations to their data set, economists Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez constructed income statistics based on IRS data that go back to 1913. They found that the gap between the ultra-wealthy and the rest of us is much bigger than you would think…
(Read Full Text)

america-wakiewakie:

Princeton Concludes What Kind of Government America Really Has, and It’s Not a Democracy | PolicyMic 

The news: A new scientific study from Princeton researchers Martin Gilens and Benjamin I. Page has finally put some science behind the recently popular argument that the United States isn’t a democracy any more. And they’ve found that in fact, America is basically an oligarchy.

An oligarchy is a system where power is effectively wielded by a small number of individuals defined by their status called oligarchs. Members of the oligarchy are the rich, the well connected and the politically powerful, as well as particularly well placed individuals in institutions like banking and finance or the military.

For their study, Gilens and Page compiled data from roughly 1,800 different policy initiatives in the years between 1981 and 2002. They then compared those policy changes with the expressed opinion of the United State public. Comparing the preferences of the average American at the 50th percentile of income to what those Americans at the 90th percentile preferred, as well as the opinions of major lobbying or business groups, the researchers found out that the government followed the directives set forth by the latter two much more often.

It’s beyond alarming. As Gilens and Page write, “the preferences of the average American appear to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy.” In other words, their statistics say your opinion literally does not matter.

That might explain why mandatory background checks on gun sales supported by 83% to 91% of Americans aren’t in place, or why Congress has taken no action on greenhouse gas emissions even when such legislation is supported by the vast majority of citizens.

This problem has been steadily escalating for four decades. While there are some limitations to their data set, economists Thomas Piketty and Emmanuel Saez constructed income statistics based on IRS data that go back to 1913. They found that the gap between the ultra-wealthy and the rest of us is much bigger than you would think…

(Read Full Text)

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So let me get this straight:

dink-182:

hungrylikethewolfie:

daisyunderthestars:

People are boycotting Kraft just because of this one ad

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yet

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no one

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sees

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a

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problem

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with

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these ones?

Wow, when you put it that way it almost seems like we live in a rampantly sexist, misogynistic, and hypocritical society.

Yes we do my friend. Yes we do.

(via kieran-648)

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theladyem:

path-to-personal-eudaimonia:

seahorseteacher:

omgkoreawhyyy:

whippedcreamandsoju:

I just HAD to press play…

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Honestly… I don’t know if I’ve ever heard/seen anything worse. It seems like a joke, but it’s obviously not. And what kind of accent is she trying to do throughout? GOD WHY DID I WATCH THAT

can’t unsee that. ugh. why did i watch that. 

…..why

oh god this was so embarrassing why did that happen